Panificio Giuliani dal 1968

NOTE! This site uses cookies and similar technologies.

If you not change browser settings, you agree to it.

I understand
Il Panettone

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Who discovered the Panettone? According to Italian tradition, the origins of Panettone are based on historical legends that enjoy equal credit:

Legend 1: Messer Ughetto of the Atellanis, a falconer, lived in the region of the Graces in Milan. He fell in love with Algisa, a baker’s beautiful daughter. In order to be close and win her love, he became the baker’s apprentice. To win favor with the baker and prove his business abilities, he sought out how to increase sales. He decided to invent a dessert. He mixed the best flour of the mill with eggs, butter, honey and sultanas. This new baked dessert was a huge success with everyone wanting to try it. Soon after, the two lovers married and lived happily ever after.

Legend 2: The cook at the Court of the Duke Ludovico, the Moor was entrusted to prepare a sumptuous lunch for Christmas. Many noblemen of the district had been invited. The cook unfortunately forgot about the cake in the oven and it burned. He was beside himself for he knew what failure would bring to him. Toni, a young servant in the kitchen, saw the desperation of the cook. He proposed a solution to the cook: “With what remained in the cupboard this morning, I baked a cake with flour, butter, eggs, candied citron and some sultanas. If you want, you can bring this to the Duke’s table.” Desperate, the cook agreed and, trembling, watched behind a curtain for the guest’s reaction. All were enthusiastic and wanted to know the name of the wonderful confection. The cook came out and announced the secret, “It is Toni’s bread”. Since then it has been known as Panettone or “bread of Toni”.

Antico Panificio Giuliani’s Panettone is made with flour, a special blend of yeast, butter, sugar, fresh eggs and sultanas. In the tradition of an artisan confectioner, some special ingredients are added by Luigi. Special attention is made that all of the ingredients are free of any chemical additives and preservatives.

As in the baking process of the Colomba, the Panettone needs to be turned upside down so that they do not “set” improperly. Ours are different; due to the special blend of yeast, we avoid the difficult and arduous job of making sure no “holes” appear in the interior of the cake and all ingredients are evenly distributed. The care and quality of these fresh ingredients as well as the painstakingly long process speaks to the artisan workmanship that is exemplified at this bakery.

The fifty hours times of workmanship, the care and the quality of the ingredients, besides the absence of any preservative or chemical additive differentiate our handmade Panettone from the industrial

Il Pandoro

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

According to some, the origins of this recipe derive from Austria. The so called “Bread of Vienna” was most likely derived from the French brioche. To others, it could derive from the “Bread of Gold” that was served on the tables of the wealthiest Venetians. In Verona, the birthplace of Romeo & Juliet, as late as the 1800’s, the “Nadalin” cake was another version. Most likely, each country and region gave birth to their own variation.

The Pandoro is a sweet of bread with a glaze on the exterior.

La Colomba di Pasqua

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

In Milan, Pavia and surrounding area, the ancient Italian legend and custom at Easter is to serve and eat a cake, shaped like a dove, to honor the memory of Saint Colombano.

The legend is that around 612 AD, the Irish abbot was received by the reigning Lombard’s who invited him to a sumptuous lunch offering the guests a wide range of rich and tasty foods.  

However, even though it was not Friday, Colombano and his monks refused the rich meats as they were served during the season of Lent. Queen Teodolinda, not understanding the religious customs of Lent, took great offense to her guest’s refusal. The abbot, realizing that diplomacy was required, told the hostess that they would partake of the feast if the meats could be blessed beforehand.

The abbot lifted his right hand in the sign of the cross and the dishes turned into white, dove shaped bread. The Queen was so taken with the miracle and the holiness of the abbot, that she gave him the territory of Bobbio where the abbey of St. Colombano was built….but that is another story! The white dove has become the symbol of Saint Colombano and the dove is always represented on his shoulder.

Antico Panificio Giuliani’s Colomba is made with flour, a special blend of yeast, butter, sugar, fresh eggs and candied fruits. In the tradition of an artisan confectioner, some special ingredients are added by Luigi. Special attention is made that all of the ingredients are free of any chemical additives and preservatives. The doves are individually hand shaped; no industrial molds are used in the preparation of this specialty cake; each dove is unique.

An interesting difference: Usually, after the baking process, all “doves” need to be turned upside down so that they do not “set” improperly. Ours are different; due to the special blend of yeast, we avoid the difficult and arduous job of making sure no “holes” appear in the interior of the cake. The care and quality of these fresh ingredients as well as the painstakingly long process speaks to the artisan workmanship that is exemplified at this bakery.

lingua | language | langue

Cerca

Logo Panificio Giuliani

Please publish modules in offcanvas position.